Mama's Got a Plan:

Maternity Care, Health Insurance, and Reproductive Justice


Catching up cartoons

The following cartoons were published on Facebook before they were posted here. Without further ado …

Subject-consent-object (SCO order!)

 

The usage “consent the patient” is one that horrified us when it first came to our attention. If any verb should be an active one, “consent” is the one.

Image credits

“Doctor Visit” is by mohamed mohamed mahmoud hassan, shared under a Creative Commons license. We added the facial features, which were chosen from assortments provided here and here. The framed picture is courtesy a collection of fantasy landscape cartoons.

 

Medicaid work requirement

The Michigan Legislature has decided to prioritize removing health care from expanded Medicaid recipients who are not working sufficient hours. They were able to do so because the federal government urged states to apply for waivers in order to allow exactly this kind of proposal.

Medicaid was not established in order to force people in need to abandon their families and work sub-subsistence-level service jobs; rather, its purpose is to provide health care for those who cannot afford to purchase it, even with the subsidies that the Affordable Care Act provides (so far!). When one of the Senators behind this bill claimed that “work improves health,” we were moved to create this cartoon.

For those who require a translation for the ironwork behind the Senator: Arbeit macht Gesundheit.

Michigan Governor Snyder has not yet signed the bill, which was enacted on June 7, 2018. We encourage him to veto this measure and instead throw his support behind federal proposals to institute Medicare for All.

Image credits

The Senator and his podium are from an image entitled “Presentation,” by Mani Amini.  The audience is from a FEMA photo, in the public domain.

 

Non-Apology

So many non-apologies arrive in the passive tense, don’t they? Another cartoon in the Bureau of Apologies series.

This image only suggests the offensive words issued by the doctor representing the American Birth Doctors Association (ABDO). The real-life context in which a major professional organization suggested that women control rising maternal mortality rates by using condoms (!) is described here.

Image credits

The doctor and his podium are both from PlusPNG.com.

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The HHS Office for Civil Rights

Personal beliefs and denial of care

Earlier this month, it emerged that tennis star Serena Williams came close to experiencing life-threatening blood clots after giving birth last fall, in part because medical staff delayed taking action after she requested treatment.

More recently, President Trump announced the establishment of a Conscience and Religious Freedom Division in the HHS Office for Civil Rights. Its purpose is to expand the ability of health care providers to exercise conscience clauses. ACOG, the chief U.S. professional organization for obstetricians and gynecologists, promptly issued a press release objecting to the move, stating, “Abortion, contraception and sterilization are a part of comprehensive reproductive health care and are essential to the health of patients. Professional medical organizations have clear guidance on the issue of refusal, noting that refusals of care must not compromise patient health.”

Well. All these announcements in such close proximity generated some questions in Ye Olde Cartoon Shoppe. Who is refusing care? To whom? What is their religious justification? Is it religion, or merely culture? What about having children, as opposed to not having them – are there any civil rights in play there?

Sometimes you look around, and no one is behaving the way you think they should. Except, of course, Ms. Williams, who acted intelligently and forcefully under challenging circumstances. And Baby Olympia, who does not need to do anything except be herself – which she so clearly does, perfectly and adorably. Congratulations on both counts, Serena Williams!  For all the other participants in these various dramas, there’s this:

C

Click the image to open a larger version in a new window.

Images and permissions

  • The white-coated doctor is from Pixabay, shared under a Creative Commons license.
  • The plant is from pluspng.com. The site does not state any terms of use, but seems to make images freely available.
  • The photo of Serena Williams and Beautiful Baby Olympia is taken from an online video. Ms. Williams did not to our knowledge speak the exact words attributed to her in this cartoon, but we believe we have correctly represented her intentions.
  • The distinguished fellow with the stethoscope comes from Michelangelo’s The Creation of Adam, where he appeared with more background and without the stethoscope. The work is in the Public Domain.